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)s and other places. so supply-side tax reduction certainly counts. .. about the last time around. >> your tax pledges between the representative. if there is a net increase would you say that is in violation of the pledge and are you worried about the words that you are hearing from speaker boehner? is he talking about a net tax increase or are we hearing that rahm? >> he's in favor of revenues that come from growth and needs to see serious spending restraint. i am in favor of revenues to come from economic growth. one of the numbers that doesn't get tossed around is cbo. the cbo says if you grew at 4% a year -- congressional budget office -- they do static modeling. they do a whole bunch of things that i think understate the case for how important growth is or how you get growth, but if you grow 4% a year, reagan numbers instead of 2% a year, france, or obama's high point -- you do that for a decade, to present additional growth, 4% a year, not to present, the federal government lets $5 trillion more than it would have because more people are working. at this point, from the bottom of the re
, to a courthouse in ap mat tax and 1600 pennsylvania avenue, h.w. brands on the life of ulysses grant, thursday night at 10:15 eastern, part of booktv's four-day holiday weekend starting this thursday on c-span2. >> the name of this place still resonates with a shuddering in the hearts of the american people. more than any other name connected to the civil war except lincolns, gettysburg reverberates. americans retain the knowledge that what happened here was the crux of our terrible national trial, and even americans who aren't sure precisely what transpired on these fields know all the glory and tragedy we associate with the civil war resides most indelibly here. >> thursday night at 8 eastern lincoln director steven spielberg on the battle of getties berg and abraham lincoln's legacy, part of a four-day holiday weekend beginning thursday on c-span3's american history tv. >>> up next, a group of obama biographers discuss the president and his experiences from his first term in office. participants include authors ron suskind, david maraniss and jonathan alter. this discussion was part of the
is that we are having a continuing discussion about the budget of our country and about the taxes of our country, and indeed, about the unfair and often upside down nature of our tax code that allows people making hundreds of millions of dollars a year to pay a lower tax rate than a family that earns $100 a year -- $100,000 a year. and in the context of that discussion there is one thing i think we can do right now that would be important and helpful to the vast majority of americans, indeed to 98% of american families and 97% of american small businesses and that is to assure them that their taxes are not going to go up on january 1. assuming we can't get to a budget agreement before january 1, then automatically all of the bush tax cuts will end, and the senate has actually passed a law that will allow those tax cuts to be curtailed. to be protected. for families that earn $250,000 a year and less. that bill has passed the senate and it's now over at the house awaiting action by the house. the republican-controlled house is in a position any time the speaker chooses to call up that bil
. this is not complicated. we're not in this mes mess becae washington taxes too little. we're in this mess because washington spends too much. the american people know that and we're not going to get out of it until democrats get serious about real spending cuts and meaningful -- meaningful entitlement changes. so this morning i'd like to speak in a little more detail about why it is that we need to strengthen and protect these entitlement programs through reforms that match them up with the nation's changing demographics. democrats like to pretend as though they're the great protectors of social security, medicare, and medicaid. they make solemn pledges all the time about how they won't even entertain a discussion about reform. what they don't say is that ignoring these programs is the surest way to guarantee their collapse. all we're calling for is an honest conversation. we all know these programs are in trouble. let's figure out a solution. when it comes to entitlements, republicans are guided by a simple principle: we don't want americans to age into a system that no longer exists. we do not
a strategy, and implemented in a six-week period a 25% across the board cut in income tax rates. believe it or not as a liberal democrat, the idea was to cut taxes to raise revenue, and begin to fund the great society programs. he went to the senate, which was opposed to his ultimate goal of, you know, significant civil rights legislation, and convinced that dean of the senate, who was the budget chairman, that he would commit to a budget that was year-to-year -- not like they do matter what the increase is to grow. he used a weird accounting think of your in washington. a real dollar for dollar reduction in the budget the first time i think in 50 years, when that took place. he got that done. and it required working, sending a limo secretly to the senate to bring the senator, senator byrd i believe it was to the white house, to come in and to be courted, and held up high, and the beloved by virginia, now president of the united states, his junior when they were in the senate together. and then he got the most significant civil rights legislation passed in american history. all within si
with berkeley, stanford is far and away the most public of the two institutions. we have to include the tax benefits they receive not only for charitable contribution but earnings on the endowment which more for the support of bervegly. a sense our government policy right now does have in place certain benefits for private higher education. much the same way that you say fifty years ago public policy tended to favor public university. cultural is also an interesting feature. at most place -- [inaudible] that is the quality of the faculty they are able to recruit. and public universities, the tradition has long been they recruit outstanding junior faculty and develop them within the institution. and the elite private, you general find more theming lateral appointment at the senior level by rating the public csh raiding the public institution. when there's comparable levels of resources for the institutions, that kind of give and take tends to balance out. in the current situation part of the challenge is the danger the public universities have essentially become farms for the elite privates.
educated population. so you've got these city leaders who realize that their economy, their tax base is eroding with every kid that drops out. and that's why you see the mayor emanuels standing up and saying, we can't -- and just think about it. if he allowed the same contract to go in place, does anyone realistically think it would change the 40% dropout rate? no. at some point you've got to change it. yes, over here. oh, i'm sorry. yes. >> you talked about foreign competition in china, india, those places kind of getting ahead of us. is the model that we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the agricultural age really sufficient for the information age? is the curriculum we have in place sufficient to allow them to be inknowers and entrepreneurs? >> now, that's a softball question. [laughter] no, but realistically, you know, i'm trying not to jump out of my shoes on that. look, no. i mean, when we built this educational system, the '93 model, you know, we ended it artificially because of the compromise with farmers so kids could get out of school in enough time to
to be able to reap revenues that are all public sector dollars, all of it is tax money. so the copy guy is not suspicious. the textbook folks are getting a little closer to the classroom there. a little more suspicious, but not quite so much. i mean that part of the sector is dominated by for-profit players, whether kind of old line textbook providers or those transitioning into the new digital age and thinking more about online todaytive products. there is a little bit of push there. but much lower heat around that conversation but the closer you get to the classroom, how about school operators that contract with the local school district? a for-profit company either running one or two schools or some national network of schools and being able to, at the having a goal at the end of the year to have money left over to reinvest in the business, to make it better and to return over some period of time, whatever the expectations are of the investors, a return to shareholders. again even at harvard business school over a number of years with about 800 or so students, a very small percentage
the tax bills they are getting would benefit as well from something of a triage of the programs in the department of defense. we should ask the secretary of defense and the people who work with these programs to examine which programs in d.o.d. are the must haves, which are absolutely vital to our national security, and which programs are the need-to-have, the programs that might place our national security at some level of risk if they were to be altered and modified, and then also to have some painful examinations of programs that might be called the nice-to-haves, those that are essentially ancillary to the harder definitions of national security, even though they have been supported. and i would say that these -- the costly biofuels programs in the sense that we are proposing to fund them in the operational environment at this time would have to qualify as a nice-to-have. that does not mean that we should eliminate the biofuels. there is money in r&d to continue to examine them. but i tell you, mr. president, what a must have is. a must have is our ship-building program. whe
of barry sudden drops in government expenditure and taxes on january 1 i could have a significant negative shock to the american and global economy. the other is the need for the united states to have a credible fiscal plan over the midterm to deal with what i think is a pretty serious long run fiscal situation. those issues often get mixed together. i would repeat what our finance minister said recently. i do think there solutions to the january 1 situation and a lot of common ground. i would think people would come to those solutions and not wait for a crisis. i hear some people talking about a budget accord. that kind of talk as lister you cannot, you go over a cliff, you cannot be sure what will happen next. with the collapse of lehman brothers, how icing major event can trigger a series of the event. i have every reason to believe these people will come to some kind of agreement on what to do. i also remain, notwithstanding all the difficulties the unit the -- the u.s. economy faces. i do not want to minimize them. this is still at its heart the most entrepreneurial, dynamic developed
and budget in the white house the duck stamp tax -- duck stamp is a tax. it simply is a tax. people can say it's not a tax. it's a tax. they have defined it as a tax. we don't have the ability to redefine the meaning of words around here. and it's a tax and a tax can't originate in the senate. so the house as it's presently written, is likely to object and will object to this, i'm certain. another easily fixed problem in the bill is this: the environment and public works committee brought the legislation up. the question of whether the duck stamp tax should be set by law by congress or given to the member of the present staff to set at whatever level he wants was discussed. and senator boxer agreed with those who shared the view that we shouldn't be delegating the power to an unelected cabinet person to set taxes in the united states of america. you can set duck stamp under this bill at any level he wants to set it at. that's not good. this is constitutional. i really feel strongly about it. congress must never cede its power to tax to a single person not even accountable or any other entit
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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